North West Film Archive
NWFA Homepage
Watch Calling Blighty Issues In Full
Record 1 - 20 of 28 | Next › | Last »

Below is the list of Calling Blighty issues held at the North West Film Archive.
Click on a picture to watch the issue in full.

Issue 52

On a canteen-style film set in Bombay, servicemen (and one woman) from Oldham take turns to approach the camera and send personal messages back to their loved ones at home. After the individual messages have been delivered, the participants all gather round the mess room piano to hear ‘Harry’ play ‘Jungle Swing’, as they wave and cheer at the camera.

Issue 58

On a canteen-style film set in Bombay, servicemen from St Helens take turns to send personal messages back to their loved ones at home, to a soundtrack of gentle piano music . After the individual messages have been delivered, the soldiers all gather round the mess room piano to sing ‘We’ll Meet Again’ and wave and cheer at the camera.

Issue 59

Servicemen from Warrington send personal messages back home to their loved ones from a film studio in Bombay set out as a mess room. Opens with soldiers playing darts as piano music plays in the background. After the messages have been delivered, it's over to 'Harry' who plays an upbeat 'We'll Meet Again' on the piano as the men gather round before joining in to sing and waving goodbye.

Issue 82

Servicemen from Manchester, Salford, Oldham and Edenfield send personal messages back home to their loved ones from a film studio in Bombay set out as a canteen. Piano music plays in the background. After the messages have been delivered, they all gather round the mess room piano to hear ‘Harry’ thump out some tunes.

Issue 85

In the ‘mess room’, which is actually a film set in Bombay, men serving in the Far East take turns to approach the camera and send personal messages back to their loved ones in and around Manchester. The film concludes with the men doing their best to sing ‘She’s a Lassie from Lancashire’ with ‘no Gracie Fields’ to help them out.

Issue 99

Servicemen from Manchester send personal messages back home to their loved ones from a film studio in Bombay decked out as a canteen. Big Band music plays in the background. After the messages have been delivered, the camera pans around the men seated in the mess room as they wave and cheer and say goodbye.

Issue 132

Men from the Royal Artillery are filmed together in a jungle clearing in Burma. Each man takes a turn to step forward to the camera to send a personal message home to loved ones in and around Manchester before they all sign off with a verse of ‘She’s a Lassie from Lancashire’.

Issue 149

A group of servicemen from Manchester, Salford, Todmorden and Warrington are filmed together in a jungle clearing in Burma. Each man takes a turn to step forward to the camera to send a personal message home to his loved ones before they all sign off with a short group rendition of “We’ll Meet Again”.

Issue 166

Servicemen from Manchester, Salford and beyond send personal messages back home to their loved ones by speaking directly to camera on location in India. In the opening sequence a truck, with ‘Hello Manchester’ chalked on the side, pulls up and the first group of servicemen leap out of the back. The film closes with the men coming together under a tree to sing ‘She’s a Lassie from Lancashire’.

Issue 178

Servicemen (and one woman) from the Royal Navy send personal messages to their loved ones back in Manchester, Salford, Bolton, Mossley and Wilmslow from a coastal location in Colombo, Ceylon. The film ends with the ‘boys and girls of the Royal Navy’ walking quietly away, smiling at the camera, with the sea in the background.

Issue 183

RAF servicemen send personal messages to their loved ones back home in the North West of England from Ceylon. The first group of airmen take turns to approach the camera whilst their colleagues play football in the background. The final three men interrupt their work on a truck engine to deliver their messages. The films ends with the whole group walking quickly towards and past the camera, cheering and waving.

Issue 191

Soldiers serving in Ceylon send messages back to their loved ones in Manchester and the surrounding area. The film opens in a small clearing where contributors take turns to speak to the camera before introducing the next caller. Further messages are delivered in front of various buildings using different set piece techniques. The film ends with the whole group walking quickly towards and past the camera, waving and saying cheerio.

Issue 199

Men from the 11th East African Division serving in the Far East (’fresh from their victories in the Kabaw Valley’) send personal messages home to their loved ones in the North West of England. The film opens in a clearing where the African men of the Regiment are moving timber. An ‘argument’ ensues before the first caller ‘notices’ the camera and delivers his message. Further messages are sent from a makeshift badminton court and a village setting. The film ends with the African men of the Regiment performing an ngoma dance.

Issue 203

Servicemen from Manchester, Salford and beyond send personal messages to their loved ones from Burma. Messages are delivered from a variety of locations: the banks of the Irrawaddy River, in front of temples, next to two bullocks and a cart, around a fire making tea, at a roadside and amongst cleared land. The last three soldiers wave to the camera as they walk away and a voiceover says “Cheerio to our boys in Burma!”.

Issue 210

Men from the RAF and Royal Navy serving in Burma send messages home to their loved ones in and around the Manchester area. The film opens in a camp outside a war-damaged ‘Talbot House’ in which airmen take turns to deliver their messages straight to camera. Further callers appear in an overgrown ‘monastery garden’, in front of a bridge, and on a beach. The last three men walk away from the camera towards the sea and wave as a voiceover says ‘cheerio... to your boys in Burma’.

Issue 212

Men from the Army and RAF serving in Burma send personal messages back to their loved ones in Manchester and the North West. The messages are delivered straight to camera from a variety of locations: a riverbank, a jungle clearing, by a roadside, in a camp. The last group of men stand in front of a truck to deliver their messages before jumping into the back of it, cheering and waving, as the vehicle moves off.

Issue 219

Servicemen in the Far East send personal messages home to their loved ones in Manchester and elsewhere in the North West. The film opens in a garden setting with pagodas as the men arrive in jeeps. Messages are delivered in relaxed settings around the grounds, including a scene in which three sailors are fishing by a river. The film ends with the men walking past the camera in single file, waving and saying their goodbyes, before piling back into their jeeps and driving off as ‘I’ll Be Seeing You’ plays in the background.

Issue 226

Servicemen in the Far East send personal messages home to their loved ones in Manchester and elsewhere in the North West. The film opens in a garden setting as the men march along a path singing ‘Glory Glory What a Hell of a Way to Die’. Messages are delivered in relaxed settings around the grounds, before the whole group march off singing ‘Glory Glory’ again, waving and shouting out their farewells.

Issue 241

Servicemen in Malaya send personal messages home to their loved ones in Manchester and elsewhere in the North West. The film opens in a garden setting as the men march over a bridge and towards the camera singing ‘Take Me Back to Dear Old Blighty’. Messages are delivered in relaxed settings around the grounds, before the film ends with the whole group marching towards the camera singing ‘Show Me the Way to Go Home’ and saying cheerio as they pass.

Issue 246

Servicemen on leave at Penang racecourse in Malaya, send personal messages home to their loved ones in the North West of England. The film opens with the group marching towards the camera singing ‘She’s a Lassie from Lancashire’. Messages are delivered in relaxed settings around the grounds, before the film ends with the whole group marching past the racecourse stand towards the camera singing ‘It’s a Long Way to Tipperary’, waving and shouting cheerio as they pass.

Record 1 - 20 of 28 | Next › | Last »